Anemone-fish of the Ryukyu Islands by Shawn Miller

Have you ever wondered how many species of anemonefish are found in the beautiful waters of Okinawa?  There are six anemonefishes found here. Most are found in shallow water and all live in a venomous sea anemone for protection. Their biggest threats are over-collecting.

(1) Nemo – Is known as the false clown anemonefish (Amphiprion ocellaris). In my opinion is the most beautiful anemone fish of the Ryukyu Islands.

 false clownfish  (Amphiprion ocellaris)

false clown anemonefish (Amphiprion ocellaris) © Shawn Miller

The false clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris) photographed in black & white.

false clown anemonefish (Amphiprion ocellaris)

false clown anemonefish (Amphiprion ocellaris) © Shawn Miller

(2) The Tomato anemonefish (Amphiprion frenatus) is the most abundant anemonefish found here. The juveniles sometimes have multiple white stripes.

 Tomato anemonefish (Amphiprion frenatus)

Tomato anemonefish (Amphiprion frenatus) © Shawn Miller

Sometimes the Tomato anemonefish (Amphiprion frenatus)  can be found in large colonies with over sixty fish living together in multiple sea anemones.

 Tomato anemonefish (Amphiprion frenatus)

Tomato anemonefish colony © Shawn Miller

The Tomato anemonefish (Amphiprion frenatus) in black & white.

© Shawn Miller

Tomato anemonefish (Amphiprion frenatus) © Shawn Miller

 (3) Clark’s anemonefish ( Amphiprion clarkii ) is fairly common as well. A tough anemonefish for sure! 

Clark's anemonefish ( Amphiprion clarkii )

Clark’s anemonefish ( Amphiprion clarkii ) © Shawn Miller

The juveniles are often found in small nursery anemones. Is it possible these baby anemone fish see the fluorescence of the anemone?  I have always wondered how the hatchlings find a small anemone far away for a reef.

Clark's anemonefish ( Amphiprion clarkii ) and fluorescence

Clark’s anemonefish ( Amphiprion clarkii ) and fluorescence © Shawn Miller

 For some strange reason, the Clarks anemonefish (Amphiprion clarkii) turns dark black when living in the giant carpet sea anemone.

black Clark's anemonefish ( Amphiprion clarkii )

black Clark’s anemonefish ( Amphiprion clarkii ) © Shawn Miller

(4) The orange anemonefish (Amphiprion sandaracinos) is uncommon here. They all have a white dorsal stripe running from the lip to the tail.

Orange anemonefish (Amphiprion sandaracinos)

Orange anemonefish (Amphiprion sandaracinos) © Shawn Miller

5) The saddle anemonefish (Amphiprion polymnus) is scarce here. They are usually found living in a large carpet anemone around white fine sand.

saddle anemonefish (Amphiprion polymnus)

saddle anemonefish (Amphiprion polymnus) © Shawn Miller

(6) The pink anemonefish (Amphiprion perideraion) is fairly common here. They all have a white dorsal stripe running from the eyes to the tail and a narrow white head bar.

pink anemonefish (Amphiprion perideraion)

pink anemonefish (Amphiprion perideraion) © Shawn Miller

The pink anemonefish (Amphiprion perideraion) in black & white.

pink anemonefish (Amphiprion perideraion)

pink anemonefish (Amphiprion perideraion) © Shawn Miller

The three-spotted damselfish (Dascyllus trimaculatus) seeks shelter in sea anemones at the juvenile stage for protection. It leaves the anemone when its ready and never comes back.

The three-spotted damselfish (Dascyllus trimaculatus) seek shelter in sea anemones at the juvenile stage for protection.

The three-spotted damselfish (Dascyllus trimaculatus) © Shawn Miller

Okinawa offers some of the best shore diving in the world.  What are you waiting for!

Have a great day!