Akamata – Ryukyu odd-tooth snake

The Ryukyu odd-tooth snake (Dinodon semicarinatum) is a non-venomous snake found throughout the Ryukyu Islands. They are fairly common here on Okinawa and are usually found at night. The Akamata is a natural enemy of the venomous Habu snake. They are one of the few snakes capable of feeding on venomous pit vipers.  More effort should be focused on conserving this native snake for this specific reason. This beautiful snake has been overlooked and needs to be protected. Sadly I see more dead in the road than alive.

  • Scientific name:  Dinodon semicarinatum
  • Local name:  Akamata – Ryukyu odd-tooth snake
  • Distribution:  Ryukyu Islands
  • Habitat:  Forests, drainage ditches and housing areas
  • Diet:  Snakes, lizards, frogs, snakes, birds, baby sea turtles and rodents.
  • Average size:  100cm -180cm
  • Color:  Black, orange with a yellow belly.

They are often found crossing the road at night.

Akamata - Ryukyu odd-tooth snake

Akamata – Ryukyu odd-tooth snake

Ready to strike ! A example of what the Akamata looks like when it is threatened.

Akamata - Ryukyu odd-tooth snake

Akamata – Ryukyu odd-tooth snake

Photographed on a white for the Meet Your Neighbours Project. (Connecting People Worldwide with the Wildlife in their Community)

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Ryukyu odd-tooth snake -MYN

Slow and low perspective -

Crossing the road - Ryukyu odd-tooth snake

Crossing the road – Ryukyu odd-tooth snake

A juvenile Akamata feeding on a common gecko tail first.

Akamata feeding on a gecko - tail first

Akamata feeding on a gecko – tail first

A large Akamata feeding on a Okinawa tree frog.  Kume Island.

Ryukyu odd-tooth snake feeding

Ryukyu odd-tooth snake feeding

A juvenile Akamata feeding on a Okinawa tree lizard .Okinawa

Ryukyu odd-tooth feeding

Ryukyu odd-tooth feeding

This My fist time seeing a juvenile Akamata pull back and puff out its head to resemble the diamond shape of a venomous pit viper. Is the Coincidence or mimicry. I know this is common occurrence with other non-venomous snakes around the world. I believe this juvenile snake saw me as a threat.

Ryukyu odd-tooth snake puffing its head

Ryukyu odd-tooth snake puffing its head

Have a great day!

 

Asian grass frog – Amphibians of the Ryukyu Islands

The Asian grass frog  ( Fejervarya limnocharis ) is found on Mainland Japan and most of the Ryukyu Islands. The warty frog is fairly common on Okinawa. It’s biggest threats are pesticide exposure and habitat loss.

  • Scientific name: Fejervarya limnocharis
  • Common name: Asian grass frog, marsh frog and common pond frog
  • Distribution: Ryukyu Islands and Mainland Japan
  • Habitat: Rice fields, ditches, marshes, parks and farm fields.
  • Diet: Insects
  • Average size: 45mm-75mm
  • Color: light brown with a white belly
Asian grass frog - 60mm macro

Asian grass frog – Canon 70d * 60mm macro

Wide angle macro - Canon 70d *Tokina fisheye

Wide angle macro – Canon 70d *Tokina fisheye

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Asian grass frog- Macro

Asian marsh frog - drainage ditch

Asian marsh frog – drainage ditch

Asian marsh frog

Asian marsh frog

Asian grass frog feeding

Asian grass frog feeding

Asian marsh frog - Okuma resort

Asian marsh frog – Okuma resort

Asian grass frog -MYN

Asian grass frog -MYN

All images were taken with the Canon 70d  EFS 10-18mm, Canon 60mm or Tokina fish-eye lens, Scroll down to subscribe to my blog posts -

Okinawa green tree frog – Ryukyu Islands

The Okinawa green tree frog ( Rhacophorus viridis viridis ) is found on Okinawa, Iheya and Kume Island.

  • Scientific name: Rhacophorus viridis viridis
  • Common name: Okinawa Green tree frog
  • Distribution: Okinawa, Kume, and Iheya.
  • Habitat: Forests, mountain slopes and farm fields near water.
  • Diet: Insects
  • Average size: 45mm-75mm
  • Color: Olive green, Bright green and dark brown
Okinawa Green tree frog

Okinawa Green tree frog

This beautiful frog is a master of camouflage.  I often find it resting on tree branches, blending in with the surrounding green leaves.

Natural habitat

Natural habitat

Green tree frog

Green tree frog

Breading season stretches from February to April on Okinawa.

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Green tree frog mating

On Kume Island the tree frogs transform to a golden brown when mating.

Kume Island tree frog

Kume Island tree frog

They construct a foam nest on a tree branch above a still water source. Eventually the foam liquefies when the eggs are ready to hatch.

Frog foam nest

Frog foam nest

Not all frogs survive to make the nest. The Akamata is the most common snake on the Okinawan Islands.  It feeds on venomous habu snakes, baby sea turtles, lizards and frogs.

Akamata feeding

Akamata feeding

 

Photographed on white for the Meet your Neighbours global biodiversity project.

MYN Technique

MYN Technique

MYN Technique

MYN Technique

Green tree frog

Green tree frog

I often find this frog searching for insects on the road.

Roadside green tree frog

Roadside green tree frog

Let’s protect the wildlife of Okinawa.

 

 

The hunt for the habu – Izena Island

Izena Island is known for not having any venomous snakes on the Island. I always thought this was impossible since the surrounding islands all have venomous snakes. After five trips we finally found a Habu.

The Princess habu was found resting on a rock above a fresh water source.

The princess habu -

The Princess habu – Photo by David Orr

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Hime habu – Izena Island

Hime habu  - Izena Island

Hime habu – Izena Island

Hime habu  - Izena Island

Hime habu – Izena Island

The Hime habu was found October 9th 2016 on Izena Island.  It was located at the Izena castle site.

Izena castle

Izena castle -Iphone 6s

A sign at the port welcomes visitors to to the beautiful Island.  It states – no habu on the Island.

Izena Island welcome sign- No Habu

Izena Island welcome sign- No Habu

Be safe exploring the beautiful Islands of Okinawa.

Learn more about the venomous snakes of Okinawa in my previous blog post. http://okinawanaturephotography.com/venomous-snakes-of-okinawa-japan/

 

 

Sword-tailed newt – Endangered species

The Sword-tailed newt (Cynops ensicauda) is an endangered species found on the main islands of Okinawa an Amami. It is currently listed endangered on the IUCN red list of threatened species. This amphibian is decreasing in numbers due to deforestation and road kill.

  • Scientific name: Cynops ensicauda
  • Distribution: Okinawa and Anami Islands
  • Habitat: Forests, wetlands and fresh water streams
  • Diet: Amphibian eggs, tadpoles, snails, worms and insects
  • Average size: 100-180mm
Sword tailed newt with stripes

Sword tailed newt with stripes

They all have bright orange bellies, which serve as a warning sign to predators that they are poisonous. When threatened they produce a transparent skin toxin.

  •  Poisonous animals are toxic if you eat them or ingest their secretions.  Irritations may occur after handling these newts if you have open wounds. Avoid rubbing your eyes or placing your hands in your mouth.

Photographed on a white field studio board for the Meet your neighbours global biodiversity project (MYN).  All images are used for conservation awareness and educational purposes.

MYN technique - Sword tailed newt

MYN technique – Sword tailed newt

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Sword-tailed newt- Okinawa, Japan

The newt photographed in its natural habitat.

Sword-tailed newt in natural habitat

Sword-tailed newt in natural habitat

Sword tailed newt

Sword tailed newt -Onna village

Sword tailed newt

Sword tailed newt – Onna village


An average looking sword-tailed newt with a blood sucking leech

Sword-tailed newt with leech

Sword-tailed newt with leech

The Sword- tailed newt is often found crossing the road on rainy days in northern Okinawa. The government has designed specialized wildlife steps for animals that get trapped in road side drainage ditches. These steps allow the newts to crawl out safely.

Wildlife steps

Wildlife steps

Lets protect the wildlife of Okinawa!

 

 

 

 

Facing extinction – Ishikawa’s Frog (Odorrana ishikawae)

Ishikawa’s frog (Odorrana ishikawae) is the most beautiful frog found in Japan. It is only found in northern Okinawa and currently on the endangered species list. It is one of the many endemic species facing extinction due to habitat loss. Ishikawa’s frog is a designated national monument of Okinawa.

This is my favorite frog on Okinawa. I have only seen about a dozen in the last three years.

shikawa's Frog (Odorrana ishikawae) Yanbaru forest ,Okinawa

Ishikawa’s Frog (Odorrana ishikawae)  Night dwelling in the Yanbaru forest, Okinawa

They live around mountain streams in the Yanbaru forest. They hide in cracks and crevices in the rocks making it hard to photograph them at times.

Ishikawa's Frog (Odorrana ishikawae) Yanbaru forest ,Okinawa

Adult Ishikawa’s Frog (Odorrana ishikawae)   ” out of the den “

They are also masters of of camouflage. The unique pattern helps them blend into the the moss and leaves on the riverside.

ishikawa's Frog (Odorrana ishikawae) Yanbaru forest ,Okinawa

Ishikawa’s Frog (Odorrana ishikawae)       ” blending into the surrounding  “

Iskikawa's frog searching for a meal

Iskikawa’s frog searching for a meal

Photographing the frog on white ( MYN technique ) isolates the subject without any distractions. The images are used for conversation awareness and educational purposes.

ishikawa's Frog (Odorrana ishikawae) Yanbaru forest ,Okinawa

Ishikawa’s Frog (Odorrana ishikawae)     MYN  - Isolation Technique

A juvenile Ishikawa’s frog searching for food.  (Wide angle perspective)

herpetologists dream come true - the find

herpetologists dream come true – the find

Sometimes they can bee seen crossing the road !

Crossing the road - Kunigami Village

Crossing the road – Kunigami Village

Ishikawa's Frog

Ishikawa’s Frog – Photographed using the L&M Stella 2000

Top view- Ishikawa's frog

Top view- Ishikawa’s frog

Be careful and pay close attention to crossing wildlife.

Ishikawa's Frog

Ishikawa’s Frog -Wide angle macro photography

Let’s protect the wildlife of Okinawa!