Akamata – Ryukyu odd-tooth snake

The Ryukyu odd-tooth snake (Dinodon semicarinatum) is a non-venomous snake found throughout the Ryukyu Islands. They are fairly common here on Okinawa and are usually found at night. The Akamata is a natural enemy of the venomous Habu snake. They are one of the few snakes capable of feeding on venomous pit vipers.  More effort should be focused on conserving this native snake for this specific reason. This beautiful snake has been overlooked and needs to be protected. Sadly I see more dead in the road than alive.

  • Scientific name:  Dinodon semicarinatum
  • Local name:  Akamata – Ryukyu odd-tooth snake
  • Distribution:  Ryukyu Islands
  • Habitat:  Forests, drainage ditches and housing areas
  • Diet:  Snakes, lizards, frogs, snakes, birds, baby sea turtles and rodents.
  • Average size:  100cm -180cm
  • Color:  Black, orange with a yellow belly.

They are often found crossing the road at night.

Akamata - Ryukyu odd-tooth snake

Akamata – Ryukyu odd-tooth snake

Ready to strike ! A example of what the Akamata looks like when it is threatened.

Akamata - Ryukyu odd-tooth snake

Akamata – Ryukyu odd-tooth snake

Photographed on a white for the Meet Your Neighbours Project. (Connecting People Worldwide with the Wildlife in their Community)

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Ryukyu odd-tooth snake -MYN

Slow and low perspective -

Crossing the road - Ryukyu odd-tooth snake

Crossing the road – Ryukyu odd-tooth snake

A juvenile Akamata feeding on a common gecko tail first.

Akamata feeding on a gecko - tail first

Akamata feeding on a gecko – tail first

A large Akamata feeding on a Okinawa tree frog.  Kume Island.

Ryukyu odd-tooth snake feeding

Ryukyu odd-tooth snake feeding

A juvenile Akamata feeding on a Okinawa tree lizard .Okinawa

Ryukyu odd-tooth feeding

Ryukyu odd-tooth feeding

This My fist time seeing a juvenile Akamata pull back and puff out its head to resemble the diamond shape of a venomous pit viper. Is the Coincidence or mimicry. I know this is common occurrence with other non-venomous snakes around the world. I believe this juvenile snake saw me as a threat.

Ryukyu odd-tooth snake puffing its head

Ryukyu odd-tooth snake puffing its head

Have a great day!

 

The King of the Yanbaru forest – Holst’s frog

The Holst’s frog ( Babina holsti ) is a rare species found  in northern Okinawa. It is currently listed endangered on the IUCN red list. It is designated as a natural monument by the Okinawa Prefecture.  This large amphibian is decreasing in numbers due to habitat loss.

  • Scientific name: Babina holsti (Boulenger, 1892)
  • Distribution:  Northern Okinawa-Japan
  • Habitat:  Forest streams 
  • Diet:  Insects, worms, snails and small reptiles
  • Average Size:  100mm -125mm
King of the Jungle

King of the Jungle

The Holst’s frog is the largest frog found on Okinawa. It hides in holes, crevices and small caves in the day.

Searching for food

Searching for food

This is a size comparison photograph taken with the Iphone 6s. This is a good size  frog but they do get larger than this.

Comparison - Iphone6s

Comparison – Iphone6s

Photographed on white for the Meet Your Neighbours global biodiversity project. All images are used for conservation awareness and educational purposes.

MYN technique -Holst's frog

MYN technique -Holst’s frog

The juvenile’s have a dark brown  patch on the top section of the body. They bland in very well with their habitat.

Juvenile Holst's frog

Juvenile Holst’s frog

Juvenile holst's frog

Juvenile holst’s frog

They are sometimes found searching for food on the back roads of Northern Okinawa.

Juvenile Holst's frog - Yanbaru

Juvenile Holst’s frog – Yanbaru

Be careful and pay close attention to crossing wildlife! 

Crossing wildlife

Crossing wildlife

Lets protect the wildlife of Okinawa!

Kuroiwa’s Ground Gecko, Threatened species!

Kuroiwa’s Ground Gecko is an endangered species found throughout Okinawa. This lizard is decreasing in numbers due to poaching, deforestation, and the threat of feral cats. The lizard is high valued in the illegal pet trade market and needs to protected. This is my favorite reptile to photograph on my night adventures in Okinawa.

  • Scientific name: Goniurosaurus kuroiwae
  • Distribution:  Okinawajima
  • Habitat:  Leaf littered forests 
  • Diet:  Worms and insects
  • Average Size:  110mm -130mm
Kuroiwa's Ground Gecko

Kuroiwa’s Ground Gecko

This is the first ground gecko I photographed in 2010. I found it under a piece of carpet in Onna Village. Illegal dumping is a huge problem in Okinawa.

1st Ground Gecko

1st Ground Gecko

In the daytime they live in caves, crevices and holes in the ground

Kuroiwa's Ground Gecko

Kuroiwa’s Ground Gecko

They come out to feed at night.  

Kuroiwa's Ground Gecko

Kuroiwa’s Ground Gecko

When they feel threatened they will stand up on all fours and try to intimate you with a stare down.

Kuroiwa's Ground Gecko

Kuroiwa’s Ground Gecko

Photographed on white for the Meet your neighbours global biodiversity project. All images are used for conservation awareness and educational purposes.

Kuroiwa's Ground Gecko -MYN

Goniurosaurus kuroiwae orientalis – Ie Island

We found this juvenile ground gecko in the middle of the road.

Juvenile Ground gecko

Juvenile Ground gecko

A wide angle macro perspective .

Ground gecko -WAM

Ground gecko -Wide angle macro

Pay attention to crossing wildlife!

Kuroiwa's ground gecko -endangered

Kuroiwa’s ground gecko -endangered

Kuroiwa's ground gecko

Kuroiwa’s ground gecko top view

 

Let’s protect the beautiful animals of Okinawa!

Have a great day!