Namie’s frog (limnonectes namiyei) – Okinawa

The Namie’s frog ( Limnonectes namiyei ) is an endangered species found only in northern Okinawa. It is currently listed threatened on the IUCN red list of endangered species. This amphibian is decreasing in numbers due to deforestation and the use of pesticides.

  • Scientific name: Limnonectes namiyei
  • Distribution:  Northern Okinawa-Japan
  • Habitat:  Forest streams 
  • Diet:  Insects 
  • Average Size:  70mm -115mm
Namies frog- Stella 2000

Namie’s frog- Photographed using the Stella 2000

Photographed on white for the Meet your neighbours global biodiversity project. All images are used for conservation awareness and educational purposes.

limnonectes namiyei

Limnonectes namiyei – MYN Project

Massive legs allow them and capture prey with lightning speed.

Namie's frog ( limnonectes namiyei )

Namie’s frog ( limnonectes namiyei )

Webbed feet allow them to quickly escape predators in the water.

Namie's frog - Top view

Namie’s frog – Top view

Wide angle perspective – showing the environment it lives in.

Namie's frog - Wide angle macro

Namie’s frog – Wide angle macro

Be careful and pay close attention to crossing wildlife.

Road dweller- Namie's frog- Stella 2000

Road dweller- Namie’s frog with leeches

Lets Protect the wildlife of Okinawa!

Endangered – The Black-faced spoonbill (Platalea minor) Okinawa, Japan

The Black-faced spoonbill (Platalea minor) is a common winter visitor in southern Okinawa. The spoonbill is currently endangered and has an estimated population of less than 3000. It’s biggest treats are habitat loss, pollution and pesticides. The Black-faced spoonbill is currently listed critically endangered on the IUCN red list of threatened species.

  • Scientific name (Platalea minor)
  • Distribution: Okinawa, Korea, China, Taiwan and Japan
  • Habitat: Mud flats, mangroves and wetlands
  • Diet:  Fish
  • Average Size:  73.5 cm
The Black-faced spoonbill in flight

The Black-faced spoonbill in flight

The Black-faced spoonbill is a magnificent animal.

The beautiful Black-faced spoonbill

The beautiful Black-faced spoonbill

The Black-faced spoonbills work as a team when hunting for fish.

The Black-faced spoonbill-community hunting

The Black-faced spoonbill-community hunting

Out of all the birds at the mudflats, the spoonbills are the most consistent hunters. They rest most of the day, but when its time to fish they always catch one fairly quickly.

The Black-faced spoonbill-hunting

The Black-faced spoonbill-hunting

The Spoonbill landing – The art of conveying Motion !

Th Black-faced spoonbill -landing

Th Black-faced spoonbill -landing

Let’s Protect the beauty of Okinawa!

The Art of Wide-Angle Macro Photography by Shawn Miller

Wide-angle macro photography is popular with wildlife photographers. The technique allows the photographer to document the animal in its natural habitat and show the full scene it lives in. The photographs have great impact and deliver a bug eye perspective using a wide angle lens.

I generally use off camera flash with a custom soft box to make these photographs. Lately I have been testing a variety of on camera flashes to achieve a different perspective. One of the biggest challenges is lighting the subject evenly with soft diffused lighting.

The most popular lenses used for wide angle macro photography ( WAM )  

  • Tokina fisheye 10-17mm f3.5-4.5
  • Nikon fisheye 10.5mm f2.8
  • Sigma fisheye 15mm f2.8 E
  • Venus Laowa 15mm f4 –    (Manual focus only)

Here are some of my favorite wide-angle macro images photographed in Okinawa-Japan.

Fighting pose - Preying mantis, IPhone 6s

Fighting pose – Preying mantis, IPhone 6s

Hermit crabs of Okinawa

Hermit crabs of Okinawa

Geograpsus grayi with eggs

Geograpsus grayi with eggs

Ishikawa's Frog

Ishikawa’s Frog – The most beautiful frog in Japan

Horn-eyed ghost crab at sunset

Horn-eyed ghost crab at sunset -Nikon 10.5mm

img_8686

Herping in the yanbaru forest

Crabs with trash homes - Sesoko

Crabs with trash homes – Sesoko

I own this fence -Golden habu

I own this fence – Golden habu

Ghost crab - Nagahama beach

Ghost crab – Nagahama beach

Pryer's keelback feeding on a white jawed frog

Pryer’s keelback feeding on a white jawed frog

Baby loggerhead leaving the nest

Baby loggerhead leaving the nest

coconut rhinoceros beetle

Invasive – Coconut rhinoceros beetle

Blue rock-thrush with wings spread

Blue rock-thrush with wings spread

Princess habu -Yanbaru

Princess habu -Yanbaru

Kuroiwa's ground gecko crossing the road

Kuroiwa’s ground gecko crossing the road

Okinawan green tree frog

Okinawan green tree frog

Giant stag Beetle (Dorcus titanus)

Giant stag Beetle (Dorcus titanus) -Ie Island

Okinawa tip-nosed frog ( Rana narina )

Okinawa tip-nosed frog ( Rana narina )

Hermit crab at sunset

Hermit crab at sunset

Land crab crossing the road  at night

Land crab crossing the road at night

Hermit crabs with beach trash homes

Hermit crabs with beach trash homes

on the move- Black-breasted leaf turtle

On the move- Black-breasted leaf turtle

Asian long horned beetle

Asian long horned beetle

Crabs with trash homes-Yomitan

Crabs with trash homes-Yomitan

Road dweller- Namie's frog- Stella 2000

Road dweller- Namie’s frog- Stella 2000

Praying mantis

Praying mantis -with kenko 1.4 T

If you would like to learn more about this technique I recommend                                          Wide-Angle Macro: The Essential Guide by Clay Bolt and Paul Harcourt Davies

  http://www.e-junkie.com/shop/product/482943.php

 

 

 

 

 

Kuroiwa’s Ground Gecko, Threatened species!

Kuroiwa’s Ground Gecko is an endangered species found throughout Okinawa. This lizard is decreasing in numbers due to poaching, deforestation, and the threat of feral cats. The lizard is high valued in the illegal pet trade market and needs to protected. This is my favorite reptile to photograph on my night adventures in Okinawa.

  • Scientific name: Goniurosaurus kuroiwae
  • Distribution:  Okinawajima
  • Habitat:  Leaf littered forests 
  • Diet:  Worms and insects
  • Average Size:  110mm -130mm
Kuroiwa's Ground Gecko

Kuroiwa’s Ground Gecko

This is the first ground gecko I photographed in 2010. I found it under a piece of carpet in Onna Village. Illegal dumping is a huge problem in Okinawa.

1st Ground Gecko

1st Ground Gecko

In the daytime they live in caves, crevices and holes in the ground

Kuroiwa's Ground Gecko

Kuroiwa’s Ground Gecko

They come out to feed at night.  

Kuroiwa's Ground Gecko

Kuroiwa’s Ground Gecko

When they feel threatened they will stand up on all fours and try to intimate you with a stare down.

Kuroiwa's Ground Gecko

Kuroiwa’s Ground Gecko

Photographed on white for the Meet your neighbours global biodiversity project. All images are used for conservation awareness and educational purposes.

Kuroiwa's Ground Gecko -MYN

Goniurosaurus kuroiwae orientalis – Ie Island

We found this juvenile ground gecko in the Yanbaru forest in Northern Okinawa.

Juvenile Ground gecko

Juvenile Ground gecko

A wide angle macro perspective .

Ground gecko -WAM

Ground gecko -Wide angle macro

Pay attention to crossing wildlife!

Kuroiwa's ground gecko -endangered

Kuroiwa’s ground gecko -endangered

Let’s protect the beautiful animals of Okinawa!

Have a great day!

 

Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle, Yanbaru forest

The Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle (Geoemyda japonica) is an endangered species found in Northern Okinawa. This turtle is decreasing in numbers due to poaching, deforestation and road kill. The turtle is high valued in the pet trade market and needs to protected. It has been designated as a National Natural Monument of Japan and is currently on the IUCN red species list as endangered.

  • Scientific name:  Geoemyda japonica (Fan, 1931)
  • Distribution:  Okinawajima
  • Habitat:  Leaf littered wetland forests 
  • Diet:  Worms, snails, insects, crustaceans and fruit
  • Average Size:  140mm- 160mm

The Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle in its natural habitat.

Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle (Geoemyda japonica)

Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle (Geoemyda japonica)

Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle (Geoemyda japonica)

Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle (Geoemyda japonica)

Black breasted leaf turtle - up close

Black breasted leaf turtle – up close

You can see why they named it the Black-breasted leaf turtle. We helped this turtle get off of the road and placed it safely back into the forest.

Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle (Geoemyda japonica)

Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle (Geoemyda japonica)

Photographed on white for the Meet your neighbours global biodiversity project. All images are used for conservation awareness and educational purposes.

Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle (Geoemyda japonica)

Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle – MYN Project

I usually find the Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle crossing the road at night or early in the morning.

Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle (Geoemyda japonica)

Ryukyu black-breasted leaf turtle (Geoemyda japonica)

All the roads in northern Okinawa have specialized wildlife steps for the the animals that get trapped in the drainage ditch. These steps allow the turtles and other animals to crawl out safely using the steps.

Wildlife steps

Wildlife steps

Watch your speed and pay close attention to crossing wildlife.

Wildlife crossing warning signs

Wildlife crossing warning signs

watch out for crossing turtles -Kunigami village

watch out for crossing turtles -Kunigami village

IMG_3538

The truth is I have seen more of these turtles dead than alive. Watch your speed!

Road kill

Road kill

Lets protect the wildlife of Okinawa.

Have a great day!

 

5 Day Black & White Photo Challenge – Okinawa

I was nominated by Martin Bailey to participate in the 5 Day Black & White Challenge. I had to post one black & white Image each day while challenging another photographer to do the same. It was difficult to find subjects that really popped out in B&W. Below are the five images I posted during this challenge. All images were taken underwater on Scuba in the beautiful waters of Okinawa.

Tomato Anemonefish (Amphiprion frenatus)

Tomato Anemonefish (Amphiprion frenatus)

Ringed plate coral (Pachysersis speciosa)

Ringed plate coral (Pachysersis speciosa)

Ocellaris clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris)

Ocellaris clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris)

Razor coral with polyps out

Razor coral with polyps out

Leopard sea cucumber (Bohadschia argus)

Leopard sea cucumber (Bohadschia argus)

All images were photographed with the Canon 70d in an Ikelite underwater housing.

Have a great day!

Crabs With Beach Trash Homes – Okinawa, Japan

Featured

Crabs with beach trash homes is a series I am currently working on. I photograph Blueberry hermit crabs (Coenobita purpureus) that have begun to use beach trash as their home. The crabs are photographed in their nature environment and also on white for the Meet Your Neighbours global biodiversity project. The images are used for environmental awareness and educational purposes.
Hermit crabs with beach trash homes

Hermit crabs with beach trash homes

 Blueberry hermit crabs are commonly found on local beaches in Okinawa. Most crabs are blue but occasionally have color variations of purple, pink, orange and or gray. They prefer to have a seashell as a protective home but when no shell is available they adapt.

Blueberry hermit crabs (Coenobita purpureus)

Blueberry hermit crab (Coenobita purpureus) with a seashell

Before plastic caps filled our shorelines, hermit crabs adapted using tree nuts if no shells were available.

Hermit crab and tree nut

Hermit crab and tree nut

It’s becoming more common to find crabs with beach trash homes.  I have friends combing local beaches in search of more crabs for my series. While these are cute images, our trash is becoming a serious problem to the ocean and the animals that call the shoreline home. I often find hermit crabs using a variety of plastic caps from twist top pet bottles, laundry detergent containers, small propane tanks, sports water bottles and beauty supplies.

Possible reason why Blueberry crabs adapt with beach trash
  • Limited number of available shells causing them to make due with the best homes they can find. This is a good example of adaptive behavior.

Hermit crabs are very social animals and often fight over shells. Having a protective lightweight shell that covers the abdomen (soft parts of the animal) is crucial for survival.

Hermit crabs fighting

Hermit crabs fighting over prime real estate

 

The battle -

The battle -

A close-up of the sensitive abdomen (photographed using the MYN technique)

Naked hermit crab

Naked hermit crab

Below are some of my favorite images photographed on a portable field studio board (MYN Technique). The crabs are safely placed on a white studio board, photographed and released back into the natural environment (MYN Technique).

 Blueberry hermit crabs (Coenobita purpureus)

Blueberry hermit crab (Coenobita purpureus) with cap

 Blueberry hermit crabs (Coenobita purpureus)

Blueberry hermit crab (Coenobita purpureus) in plastic tube

 Blueberry hermit crabs (Coenobita purpureus)

Blueberry hermit crab (Coenobita purpureus) in plastic top cap

 Blueberry hermit crabs (Coenobita purpureus)

Blueberry hermit crab (Coenobita purpureus) in plastic

 Blueberry hermit crabs (Coenobita purpureus)

Blueberry hermit crabs (Coenobita purpureus) in plastic cap

 Blueberry hermit crabs (Coenobita purpureus)
Blueberry hermit crabs (Coenobita purpureus) in plastic top cap
Blueberry hermit crab- Ryukyu Islands.

Blueberry hermit crab- Ryukyu Islands

Blueberry hermit crab

Blueberry hermit crab – Okuma, Okinawa

It’s important to photograph the hermit crabs in their natural habitat.  I prefer to photograph them using a wide angle lens to achieve a unique perspective.

Meet zori -Wide angle macro

Meet zori -Wide angle macro

Hermit crab- Plastic pollution

Hermit crab- Plastic pollution

Blueberry hermit crab, Hedo-Okinawa

Blueberry hermit crab,  Wide angle macro

Meet scoop- Quaker

Meet scoop- Quaker

Meet shady

Meet shady – Worldwide trash problem

Hermit crab in a glass bottle

Hermit crab in a glass bottle- Yomitan, Okinawa.

Meet cassette -CWBTH

Meet cassette -CWBTH

Airplane -Senaga Island ,Okinawa

Airplane -Senaga Island ,Okinawa

Blueberry hermit crab, Onna-Okinawa

Land hermit crab, Onna-Okinawa

Meet sparky- using a plastic cap from a cassette gas tank

Meet sparky- using a plastic cap from a cassette gas tank

Energy drink home- Trash homes

Energy drink home- Trash homes

 

The rock climber -Okinawa

The rock climber -Northern Okinawa

Sunset - Yomitan ,Okinawa

Sunset Time – Yomitan ,Okinawa

Beach pollution- CWBTH

Beach pollution- CWBTH

Tree climber-

Tree climber-

Plastic pollution - beach trash

Plastic pollution – beach trash

Crabs and plastic

Crabs and plastic – WAM

Got Meds -Beach trash

Got Meds -Beach trash

Get off the road jack -

Get off the road jack -

Crabs and plastic -Onna Village

Crabs and plastic -Onna Village

I also photograph the hermit crabs using a dedicated macro lens. I mainly use the Canon 60 mm or 100 mm macro lens to concentrate on the subject. These crabs are fairly small and  it’s important to have a lens that will focus close and deliver high quality sharpness.

Meet Edison- Gobe700

Meet Edison- Gobe700

Meet hand -toy end cap

Meet hand -toy end cap

Beach trash -hermit crabs

Beach trash -hermit crabs

 

erry hermit crab, Okuma-Okinawa

Blueberry hermit crab, Okuma-Okinawa

Laundry detergent cap - Northern Okinawa

Laundry detergent cap – Northern Okinawa

Cassette gas tank cap - bbq beach party

Cassette gas tank cap – bbq beach party

White cap on drift wood

White cap on drift wood

Meet scoop-

Meet scoop-

Blueberry hermit crab, Hedo-Okinawa

Blueberry hermit crab, Hedo-Okinawa

 

Meet Edison -Gobe700

Meet Edison -Gobe700

Blueberry hermit crab, Onna-Okinawa

Blueberry hermit crab, Onna-Okinawa

erry hermit crab, Hedo-Okinawa

Blueberry hermit crab, Hedo-Okinawa

School project  ” Crabs with beach trash homes ”  My family and I collected trash on a  local beach in Onna village. This is just a small portion of our beach trash findings.  The kids did a great job creating a project with impact.

Kirana's school project

Kirana’s school project

Kyle's school project

Kyle’s school project

Behind the scenes photograph  ” Crabs with beach trash homes ” I have documented over sixty crabs with beach trash homes. If you would like to see more images check out my Flickr account.

Shawn Miller - Crabs with beach trash homes.  photographed by David Orr

Shawn Miller – Crabs with beach trash homes.    Photographed by David Orr

 

June 10th 2010 was my first experience seeing a hermit crab with a trash home.  
 Blueberry hermit crabs (Coenobita purpureus)

Land hermit crab  climbing a tree

My series ” Crabs with beach trash homes ” has been featured on Petapixel, Business Insider, National Geographic (Belgium), Atlas Obscura, Global citizen, Plethorist, Daily telegraph, Littlethings, 15minutenews, Roaring earth, Hyperdojo, News.com.au, Follownews, Neotorama, Boingboing, Insider, Additivist, Now100fm and varies Scientific websites.

Our trash is becoming a serous problem on our shorelines! Let’s keep our shorelines clean!

Have a great day!

 

Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM Lens – Birds Of Okinawa

The Canon Ef 400mm f/5.6 USM lens is a light weight high performance prime lens. The auto focus system is impressively fast without hesitation. It performs best when photographing birds in flight and animals on the move. This is a very sharp high quality lens and would recommend purchasing it if you are on a limited budget.

The Common kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) is one of my favorite birds to photograph with the the Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM Lens.

Common kingfisher (Alcedo atthis)

Common kingfisher (Alcedo atthis)

The Black Faced Spoonbill (Platalea minor) is a common visitor in Southern Okinawa.
The Spoonbill is critically endangered and has an estimated population of less than 3000.

The Black Faced Spoonbill (Platalea minor).

The Black Faced Spoonbill (Platalea minor).

The Pryer’s woodpecker (Sapheopipo Noguchii) is the prefecture bird of Okinawa and designated as a natural treasure of Japan. It is a rare species only found in the northern part of Okinawa.

Pryer's woodpecker  (Sapheopipo Noguchii)  Yanbaru forest

Pryer’s woodpecker (Sapheopipo Noguchii) Yanbaru forest

 The Japanese white eye (Zosterops japonicus) is popular to photograph in January. The green and yellow feathers compliment the pink cherry tree blossoms.  

Mejiro - Japanese white eye, Okinawa

Mejiro – Japanese white eye

The Okinawa rail (Gallirallus okinawae) is a flightless bird only found in the northern part of Okinawa. It is a protected species and declared a living natural monument. It is currently listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as an endangered species.  In 2012 populations of this endemic bird were estimated at 1500 by the Environment Ministry.

Okinawa Rail

Okinawa Rail ( Gallirallus okinawae)

The Glossy ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) is a rare visitor in Okinawa. Nature Photographers travel from Mainland Japan to photograph this beautiful bird.

Glossy ibis (Plegadis falcinellus)

Glossy ibis (Plegadis falcinellus)

The male Japanese sparrowhawk ( Accipiter gularis ) has stunning bright red eyes. This bird can pluck the feathers off a sparrow within minutes.

Male Japanese sparrowhawk   ( Accipiter gularis )

Male Japanese sparrowhawk ( Accipiter gularis )

The Common kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) dive bombing a fish. This bird is a spectacular hunter.

Common kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) dive bombing a fish

Common kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) dive bombing a fish

Check out more Images of Birds of Okinawa-

All Images were photographed using the Canon 70d with the Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM Lens.

Canon 70d with 400mm f/5.6L USM Lens

Canon 70d with 400mm f/5.6L USM Lens

Have a great day!

 

Marine Life Washed Ashore – Typhoon Vongfong

Super Typhoon Vongfong was considered to be to be the strongest storm of the year. We were very lucky the strength of the storm died down before it landed on the Island of Okinawa. The typhoon brought heavy winds and rough sea conditions. A fair amount of marine life could not cope with these harsh conditions.

Puffer fish and trash

A Common Puffer fish ( Diodon holocanthus) with beach trash.

Blue starfish ,Onna beach-Okinawa

Blue starfish (Linckia laevigata) washed ashore

fish washed up with styrofoam

Carinalfish washed ashore with styrofoam in its mouth

Sea snake , Okinawa-Japan

Venomous Sea snake  (Emydocephalus ijimae)

Starfish washed up

Horned sea star ( Protoreaster nodusus ) washed ashore

sea hare

Large sea slug (Dolabella auricularia ) with internal shell

Sea cucumber

Sea cucumber ( Holothuria scabra ) washed ashore

Soft coral -Nago ,Bay

Soft coral  ( Lobophytum sp ) washed ashore

All images were taken on the western portion of the Island using the Canon 70d.

Have a great day!

 

Hazardous marine life of Okinawa by Shawn Miller

Okinawa offers some of the best snorkeling and scuba-diving in the world. The ocean is filled vast amounts of marine life only found here. With all recreational hobbies there are hazards to be concerned with. Okinawa has a large amount of hazardous marine life and most of it is found in very shallow water.

Safety first or pay the worst

Safety first or pay the worst – Image taken by  Shannon Fox

Ways to avoid injury

  • Be respectful and avoid harassing, touching and feeding marine life
  • Maintain good buoyancy control
  • Recognize warning signs of aggression
  • Avoid wearing shiny jewelry
  • Wear exposure protection- felt bottom booties, gloves, wetsuit or a dive skin.

The Lion fish is beautiful but a very dangerous fish. The spines deliver a painful sting with strong venom injected into the body.

  • First aid: Wash the area with soap and fresh water. Remove foreign material and control any bleeding. Soak limb in hot water (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs. Seek immediate medical treatment.
Lion fish ( Pterois volitans)

Lion fish ( Pterois volitans) – AKA fire fish

Most sea urchin injuries are due to people accidentally stepping on them in shallow surf. Wearing proper footwear decreases your chances of getting injured. 

  • First aid: Remove visible spines. Wash with soap and water. Pain control if needed-hot water  (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs. Seek medical treatment if spines have entered the joints.
The diadema urchin (Echinothrix diadema)

The Diadema urchin (Echinothrix diadema)

Moray eels deliver a viscous bite with razor sharp teeth. In some cases the eels latch on and do not let go. Avoid placing hands into holes and feeding the eels.

  • First aid: Control the bleeding and seek medical treatment. Monitor for signs of infection
Moray eel (Gymnothorax flavimarginatus )

Moray eel -Gymnothorax flavimarginatus

The crown of thorn starfish has sharp pointed spines that deliver a painful sting. The spines inject venom which cause extreme pain, discomfort and possible nausea.  Most injuries occur because divers are cutting up the starfish with a dive knife and a spine accidentally penetrates the hand. The starfish has a purpose in the ecosystem so leave it alone.

  • First aid: Remove visible spines. Wash with soap and water. Pain control if needed-hot water  (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs. Seek medical treatment if spines have entered the joints.
The crown-of-thorns starfish, Acanthaster planci

The crown-of-thorns starfish, Acanthaster planci

The blue ringed octopus is one of the most beautiful marine animals. It is only the size of a golf ball, but is extremely venomous if bitten. Avoid picking up this shallow water octopus.

  • First aid: Wash area with soap and fresh water. Apply pressure and limit your movement.  Immediate medical treatment. Monitor ABC’s
Blue Ringed Octopus (Hapalochlaena lunulata)

Blue Ringed Octopus (Hapalochlaena lunulata)

Fire coral are calcareous hydrozoans that deliver a painful sting. Avoid touching or rubbing against it.

  • First aid: Rinse with vinegar. Remove foreign matter. Wash area with salt waterPain control if needed-hot water (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs.Seek medical treatment if infection occurs.
Fire coral ( Millepora sp)

Fire coral ( Millepora sp)

The reef stone fish is the most venomous fish found on Okinawa. It is a true a master of camouflage. The Stone fish resembles a rock blending into the coral reef. The spines deliver a painful sting with strong venom injected into the body

  • First aid: Wash the area with soap and fresh water. Remove foreign material and control any bleeding. Soak limb in hot water (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs. Seek immediate medical treatment immediately.
Reef stonefish ( synanceia verrucosa ) Sunabe, Okinawa

Reef stonefish ( synanceia verrucosa )

The reef stonefish buried under the sand!

Reef stonefish ( synanceia verrucosa ) under sand

Reef stonefish ( synanceia verrucosa )  Sand dweller

Cone shells are sought after by many shell collectors for their beauty. The marine snail injects potent venom with a harpoon shaped tooth.

  • First aid: Wash area with soap and fresh water. Apply pressure and limit your movement.  Immediate medical treatment. Monitor ABC’s
Geographic cone (Gastridium geographus

Geographic cone (Gastridium geographus)

The most dangerous cone shells of Okinawa are found in shallow water

Venomous cones shells of Okinawa

Venomous cones shells of Okinawa

The scorpion fish is another master of camouflage. The spines deliver a painful sting with strong venom injected into the body. These fish will usually warn you of their presence by flaring out their fins and spines.

  • First aid: Wash the area with soap and fresh water. Remove foreign material and control any bleeding. Soak limb in hot water (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs. Seek immediate medical treatment.
Reef Scorpionfish (Scorpaenopsis Cirrhosa)

Reef Scorpionfish (Scorpaenopsis Cirrhosa)

Stinging hydroids (fireweeds) are common in Okinawa. They are all avoidable as long as you do not touch or rub up against any. The hydroids deliver a painful sting .

  • First aid: Rinse with vinegar. Remove foreign matter. Wash area with salt water.  Pain control if needed-hot water (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs. Seek medical treatment if infection occurs.
Stinging Hydroid (Aglaophenia cupressina). Also known as Sea Ferns, Fire Hydroid, Fireweed, Feather Hydroid, Stinging Seawee

Stinging Hydroid (Aglaophenia cupressina)

Sea snakes will not harm you unless provoked. I have never heard of any divers being bitten in Okinawa. Rare cases have occurred with fisherman removing their catch from nets and they were bitten on the hand.

  • First aid: Wash area with soap and fresh water. Apply pressure and limit your movement.  Immediate medical treatment. Monitor ABC’s
Turtle head sea snake (Emydocephalus ijimae)

Turtle head sea snake (Emydocephalus ijimae)

The cockatoo waspfish is a venomous fish found in shallow water. It resembles a leaf and blends in with debris very well. The spines deliver a painful sting.

  • First aid: Wash the area with soap and fresh water. Remove foreign material and control any bleeding. Soak limb in hot water (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs. Seek immediate medical treatment.
 Cockatoo waspfish (Ablabys taenianotus)

Cockatoo waspfish (Ablabys taenianotus)

The fire urchin is  the most beautiful sea urchin found in Okinawa. Its beautiful colors attract divers to pick it up. The spines inject venom which cause extreme pain and discomfort.

  • First aid: Remove visible spines. Wash with soap and water. Pain control if needed-hot water  (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs.Seek medical treatment if spines have entered the joints.
Fire urchin (Asthenosoma ijimai)

Fire urchin (Asthenosoma ijimai)

The flower urchin is the most venomous sea urchin found in the world. It is a collector urchin, often using rocks or dead coral to cover itself. The pedicellariae inject venom not the spines, which cause extreme pain and discomfort.

  • First aid: Remove foreign matter. Wash with soap and water. Pain control if needed-hot water (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs. Seek medical treatment
Flower urchin (Toxopneustes pileolus)

Flower urchin (Toxopneustes pileolus)

The bristle worm is also know as the fire worm. It delivers a powerful sting when threatened. The bristle like spines inject venom which cause extreme pain and discomfort.

  • First aid: Remove bristles using tape. Wash with soap and fresh water. Seek medical treatment if needed. monitor signs of infection
Bristle worm (Chloeis sp)

Bristle worm (Chloeis sp)

The eeltail catfish is a venomous saltwater fish found in shallow water. They usually travel in large numbers at night. The spines deliver a painful sting.

  • First aid: Wash the area with soap and fresh water. Remove foreign material and control any bleeding. Soak limb in hot water (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs. Seek immediate medical treatment.
Eeltail catfis  (Plotosus japonicus )

Eeltail catfish (Plotosus japonicus )

Sea anemones deliver a painful sting with venomous tentacles.  Below is a photograph of the viscous predator Dofleinia armata. I had these anemones in my aquarium for three years. During that time I have seen them feeding on lion fish, scorpion fish, and venomous cone snails.

  • First aid: Rinse with vinegar. Remove tentacles with tweezers. Wash area with salt water.  Pain control if needed-hot water (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs.Seek medical treatment if infection occurs.
Sea anenome (Dofleinia armata)

Sea anenome (Dofleinia armata)

Branching anemone

Branching anemone -Motobu ,Okinawa

Branching anemones are found living in the sand. They deliver a nasty sting! I have personally experienced its painful sting.

Branching Anemone

Branching Anemone

 

The false stonefish ( Scorpaenopsis diabolus) is another master of camouflage. The spines deliver a painful sting with strong venom injected into the body. These fish will usually warn you of their presence by flaring out their fins and spines.

  • First aid: Wash the area with soap and fresh water. Remove foreign material and control any bleeding. Soak limb in hot water (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs. Seek immediate medical treatment.
False stone fish

False stonefish

Stingrays are found in sandy areas near coral reefs. They have a serrated barb located at the base of the tail.  Keep your distance to avoid any injuries!

  • First aid: Wash the area with soap and fresh water. Control the bleeding. If the barb is lodged in the body, do not remove it. Soak the limb in hot water (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs. Seek immediate medical treatment! May require surgery to remove the barb.
Bluespotted stingray (Neotrygon kuhlii)

Bluespotted stingray (Neotrygon kuhlii)

The titan triggerfish is the most aggressive fish I have encountered. It is extremely territorial and will guard its nest aggressively. Attacks can be severe leaving wounds requiring stitches.  On several occasions I have pointed a dive light in their direction and it scared them off. They do not like the directional light for some reason.

  • First aid: Control the bleeding and seek medical treatment. Monitor for signs of infection
Balistoides viridescens, Titan triggerfish

Balistoides viridescens, Titan triggerfish

The bite of a titan trigger fish

Titan trigger fish bite – Photo by Daisuke Uruchida

The coral rabbitfish is a sought after fish in Okinawa. Fisherman and free divers often get injured handling this venomous fish. The spines deliver a painful sting.

  • First aid: Wash the area with soap and fresh water. Remove foreign material and control any bleeding. Soak limb in hot water (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs. Seek immediate medical treatment.
Coral Rabbitfish (Siganus corallines)

Coral Rabbitfish (Siganus corallines)

The Box Jellyfish is the most dangerous jellyfish found in the ocean. It delivers an unbearable sting with its venomous tentacles. These stings require immediate treatment and can be life threatening

  • First aid: Rinse with vinegar. Remove tentacles with tweezers. Wash area with salt water. Pain control if needed-hot water (113 F / 45 C) or use hot packs. Seek medical treatment immediately.
Box Jellyfish ( Chironex yamaguchii ) under blue light

Box Jellyfish ( Chironex yamaguchii ) under blue light

Safety first or pay the worst!

Have a great day!